Monday, August 24, 2015

Site Update: In Transition

Hey Sinners,

While I've been writing for years for Volumes of Sin, and I have gained a large audience following, I have noticed that reading and writing is slowly becoming a thing of the past.

People rather have information fed to them by means of visual and audio stimulation. That is why I am moving this project onward to YouTube.

I am still writing and reviewing. More details will come in the following days. As well as an upcoming website transition.


Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Review: Necrotic Effect - Black Box

Russian five-piece, Necrotic Effect, were forged from the ashes of many previously failed bands. After their initial formation in 2009, the group found themselves replacing their bassist twice and their drummer once before settling on a stable line-up in 2012. With a small handful of releases that spanned their early career, the band eventually released their debut full-length attempt, Black Box, in 2013; which was shortly thereafter followed up with another single. It would be easy for any metal enthusiast to say that there is little room left within the realm of thrash metal that has yet to be touched upon or that isn't grossly over-saturated. Do Necrotic Effect have what it takes to set themselves apart from the rest?

Genre: Thrash Metal
Release Date: April 27th, 2013
  1. Awake Your Angel
  2. Darkness of Me
  3. Nothing Changes Again
  4. After Your Dreams
  5. Black Box
  6. Spirits of the Dead
  7. Among the Damned
  8. Red Means Blood
  9. Graveyard in the Paradise
  10. Never At All
  11. Addiction
  12. After Your Dreams II
Total Playtime: 42 minutes, 29 seconds




Rating: 8.0/10





More Necrotic Effect Articles and Reviews



Russian five-piece, Necrotic Effect, were forged from the ashes of many previously failed bands. After their initial formation in 2009, the group found themselves replacing their bassist twice and their drummer once before settling on a stable line-up in 2012. With a small handful of releases that spanned their early career, the band eventually released their debut full-length attempt, Black Box, in 2013; which was shortly thereafter followed up with another single. It would be easy for any metal enthusiast to say that there is little room left within the realm of thrash metal that has yet to be touched upon or that isn't grossly over-saturated. Do Necrotic Effect have what it takes to set themselves apart from the rest?

It's clear from the very first track that the band have given a melodic twist to their thrashy endeavor. There are massive quantities of elaborate, well orchestrated guitar solos that are the driving forefront of the material. They fuel the album with a free flowing form of acceleration that causes the content to have a carefree demeanor, yet they're performed with immaculate accuracy. These captivating leads are placed within nearly every track, and smoothly waft through the sound waves as they carry the listener with them. Assuredly, this fundamental is the strongest force within Black Box, but the album has more to offer than just ear candy.

As sure as the solos are the spotlight of the material, the drums are the undeniable backbone. The generous amount of double bass kicks make the background thump and thrive with a lively passion that only those true to the skins can accomplish; there are absolutely no uninspired beats to be heard as Nikolai Zhukov pounds out his aggressive assaults. A wide variety of rhythms and techniques are displayed from song to song, whether it be the standard metal blast beat or more arcane hand and food combinations. The placid instrumental "Graveyard in the Paradise" shows off the drumming mastery well, as Nikolai uses a lightened touch to caress the hi-hat, snare and toms; proving once again that there is a defining sound difference between smashing skins and tapering off with a gentle graze.


Though the lead guitar and drums are the heart of the album, the bass and rhythm guitar have their share of memorable moments. The bass has a deep, smooth, contemporary style that compliments the lead guitar and more tame drumming moments; which helps to bring the aforementioned elements together with the rhythm guitar. "Nothing Changes Again" and "After Your Dreams" are prime examples of how rich the bass can become, along with the previously noted "Graveyard in the Paradise" which is overall one of the most stellar tracks available. The rhythm guitar utilized nearly every technique in order to keep the attention of the listener, and sets the grounding structure of the tracks with everything from gallops to natural and pinch harmonics.

With many genres being overwhelmed at the moment, thrash is certainly at the front lines of being at maximum capacity; it's hard for any band to make a firm stand in a sea of clones. Suffice it to say that Necrotic Effect have made their stand with Black Box, and they have proven themselves capable of standing out from the crowd. With a mix of melodic thrash and softer contemporary tie-ins, many listeners will find the material a blast of revitalization in a genre filled with nuclear devastation and party themes. The more notable tracks of the content include "Nothing Changes Again", "After Your Dreams", "Spirits of the Dead" and "Graveyard in the Paradise". It's highly recommended to give this debut full-length a shot, and to be on the lookout for more from Necrotic Effect in the future.

Physical Copy Provided by: Darknagar Records

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Review: All I Could Bleed - Burying the Past

With a name like All I Could Bleed, one would be expecting metal of the -core variety; if going by traditional standards. Surprisingly enough, this Russian quintet are an experimental/melodic death metal ensemble. Born in 2004 under an unknown name, the group changed their name to Sacrifice in 2007 and then again to All I Could Bleed in 2009. They've had their fair share of bassists, drummers and keyboardists through the years, though they eventually settled down into their current line-up. The band have shared the stage with some of the bigger names in metal, most prominently Children of Bodom and Arch Enemy. With a new album being teased around the corner, let's delve into their debut full-length, Burying the Past.

Genre: Melodic Death Metal
Release Date: June 20th, 2011
  1. Eclipse
  2. Private Hell
  3. Burying the Past
  4. Plague
  5. Under the Moon
  6. Into the Black Clouds
  7. Follow Me
  8. Valhalla
  9. Farewell
Total Playtime: 37 minutes, 21 seconds




Rating: 7.5/10





More All I Could Bleed Articles and Reviews




With a name like All I Could Bleed, one would be expecting metal of the -core variety; if going by traditional standards. Surprisingly enough, this Russian quintet are an experimental/melodic death metal ensemble. Born in 2004 under an unknown name, the group changed their name to Sacrifice in 2007 and then again to All I Could Bleed in 2009. They've had their fair share of bassists, drummers and keyboardists through the years, though they eventually settled down into their current line-up. The band have shared the stage with some of the bigger names in metal, most prominently Children of Bodom and Arch Enemy. With a new album being teased around the corner, let's delve into their debut full-length, Burying the Past.

From the beginning, there are undeniable Cradle of Filth, Children of Bodom and Arch Enemy influences present as All I Could Bleed fuse sophisticated electronic embellishments with gloomy gothic lyric matter and a rocking backdrop that sports dominate female growls. While the group as a whole are able to bring their musical structures together, the core of the material is a rather generic slab of melodic death metal. From the unremarkable tone of the guitar and the riffs that ensue to the lackluster drum patterns, the largest portion of Burying the Past relies on tried and true rhythms to carry it from start to finish.

Some tracks have more to offer than others, for instance "Under the Moon"; if you're planning on giving this band a shot, this is hands down the song that should be your introduction to them. It offers up some of the more unique compositions throughout the album, and has a tantalizing intro that harmonizes clean guitar picking with folk themed synthetic elements. It's also one of the few tracks that feature clean, power male vocals where as the remainder of the material features impressive female growls. Psycheya's vocals are harnessed and executed in a superb manner that rivals that of Angela Gossow, and in being such high quality her vocals actually take away from the clean male vocals; needless to say, the male vocals don't exactly fit in some areas where they are placed, and it may prove more beneficial if they are left out in the future.


While the rhythm guitar and drumming segments are okay at best, the bass guitar and keyboards are the elements that truly shine within the material. The synths both pierce the background and blaze through the foreground, in rampant excursions of chaotic piano trills or Castlevania-esque organs. Using a Victorian era composure style, the synthesizer provokes the idea of London during the 1800's while imbuing the ideal with a sharp, elegant edge. There's even a mild Powerglove style heard within some tracks, which come across with more of a video game based atmosphere than what one would believe to be intended; this is helped along by the harmonized lead guitar and synthesizer leads.

Even though All I Could Bleed haven't completely carved out a unique sound for themselves, they are on the right path to doing so with Burying the Past. The group have the vocals, keyboards and lead guitar to pull their sound together, but their rhythm guitar and drum work needs a serious injection of creativity. The content flounders between styles throughout the album, which keeps the band from settling on one style from too long. Even though it rarely gets the spotlight it deserves, the bass guitar displays a few jazzy solos during the material; future releases would benefit from using this element to its full potential. The clean male vocals are of the take it or leave it variety, although they do contribute slightly to the gothic approach of the band. Even with its share of faults, Burying the Past is worth a few listens; especially if you have love for Archy Enemy and Children of Bodom.

Physical Copy Provided by: Darknagar Records

Monday, February 09, 2015

Review: Nubiferous - Mana

It's absolutely without a doubt that Russia provides some of the greatest folk soundscapes, it has been proven time and time again with the likes of Beer Bear, Arkona, and many others. Those bands manage to harness the power of nature and center it around their modern day instruments, but Nubiferous are of a slightly different breed. They take the grandness of the elements and place them into an audio form, free of any electric instruments or modern drums and instead utilize the organic environment to create their rhythms and harmonies. 

Genre: Ritual Ambient, Drone, Folk
Release Date: October, 2014
  1. Clandestine
  2. Temple of the Sun
  3. Edge of Summer
  4. Mana
  5. Quercus Petraea
  6. Valun
  7. 1401
Total Playtime: 1 hour, 10 minutes, 33 seconds




Rating: 9.0/10





More Nubiferous Articles and Reviews



It's absolutely without a doubt that Russia provides some of the greatest folk soundscapes, it has been proven time and time again with the likes of Beer Bear, Arkona, and many others. Those bands manage to harness the power of nature and center it around their modern day instruments, but Nubiferous are of a slightly different breed. They take the grandness of the elements and place them into an audio form, free of any electric instruments or modern drums and instead utilize the organic environment to create their rhythms and harmonies.

Little is known about Nubiferous, or at least not much that I could find. I'll fully admit that I am not the most fluent in drone or ambient music, and thus my knowledge and naivety on where to find such information is weak at best. To be brutally honest, I'm not even sure how to review a piece such as Mana, or how to classify it in a number range of 0-10 in terms of "is it good as far as ambient folk drone is concerned?" In truth, I don't know. So this will be one of those extremely rare reviews where I'm going to use the words "I", and "me". I am a noob to this genre, so forgive me and have a laugh at my inexperience.

I'm assuming that ambient folk drone is supposed to make you feel close to nature, and if that's the case Mana surely makes me feel at one with the earth. If I close my eyes, I can envision myself wandering through the thickly wooded Russian mountainsides, following trails littered with freshly fallen pine needles and venturing to areas that are surrounded by free running streams and small wildlife. It makes me want to set out on an adventure into the wilderness and escape this suburban habitat that I so crudely call home. I can almost feel the fresh air cleansing my lungs, spirit and mind as the scent of cedar envelopes my sense of smell. The album is almost a vacation for the mind, and is a perfect escape after a long, stressful day.

The album is filled with anything and everything that would make one believe that they were actually in nature, were their eyes closed and their mind opened; chirping birds, rushing creeks, gentle streams, light buzzing, winds and wind chimes are just the beginning of the audible experience at hand. The material also has a wide variety of medieval instruments, most of which I can't even begin to name. That little thing you put in your mouth and push the thing on it to make a twang sound? That's in here, along with rain sticks, sticks hitting sticks and stones, all kinds of flutes, horns and pipes, a bell (maybe even a triangle), and many other instruments that make hollow, tranquil drone sounds.

"Valun" is the longest song, clocking in at 18 and a half minutes, and is by far the most drone inspired of the lot. The largest portion of this track is made up of a droning sound that quickly goes back and forth between the left and right speaker, all the while a light scraping is present in the background. This is also the darkest and most doom oriented piece of material, which takes away the carefree thoughts and feelings of the earlier tracks. Just as madness begins to settle in, a dissonant stringed instrument picks notes at an infrequent rhythm and breaks up the monotony.

Needless to say, I enjoyed Mana a lot. Typically, settings and sounds that are solely focused on nature and the like are not my forte, but this album may have just changed that for me. The way that the material started off relaxed and innocent, then took an unforeseen grim, mildly chaotic twist at the end is a shock to the senses. Despite the lack of lyrical matter or modern instruments, the content manages to hold the attention of the audience. It's almost like listening to an entire day in just one hour; dawn, noon and twilight are all portrayed in an audible way that paints vivid scenery in the eye of the mind. Even though, blatantly, I suck at identifying folk instruments and I have very little knowledge of the genres at hand, I may seek more simply because of Nubiferous. So let your mind go for an hour, and just drift in the sweet sublime of Mana.

Physical Copy Provided by: Post Tenebras Musica

Review: Atra Hora - Metahom

Atra Hora's Metahom is just the first chosen entry in a stack of physical promotional CDs that have been generously sent to Volumes of Sin by Darknagar Records. Serving as their first EP, but their fifth recording overall, Metahom is the latest release in the groups discography. The four-piece Russian act house the owner of Darknagar Records as their bassist/vocalist, and they have been contributing to the underground Russian metal scene since 2006. Over the years, the group have seen a number of line-up changes and 2014 was no exception; it witnessed the introduction of guitarist, Roman Kerkis.

Genre: Black Metal, Melodic Death Metal, Melodic Black Metal
Release Date: August 30th, 2014
  1. Metamorphoses
  2. Metahom
  3. Tartaros
  4. Daemonos (Daemonia Nymphe Cover)
  5. The Cardinal Sin (Dead Can Dance Cover)
  6. A Voice from the Forgotten Depths (2014 Version)
  7. They Go... (Overdose Mix)
Total Playtime: 34 minutes, 14 seconds




Rating: 6.5/10





Atra Hora's Metahom is just the first chosen entry in a stack of physical promotional CDs that have been generously sent to Volumes of Sin by Darknagar Records. Serving as their first EP, but their fifth recording overall, Metahom is the latest release in the groups discography. The four-piece Russian act house the owner of Darknagar Records as their bassist/vocalist, and they have been contributing to the underground Russian metal scene since 2006. Over the years, the group have seen a number of line-up changes and 2014 was no exception; it witnessed the introduction of guitarist, Roman Kerkis.

According to their official website, Atra Hora claims that their music may change from album to album; that statement is certainly true with Metahom, which is their tamest recording to date. The material is comprised of three new recordings, two covers and two re-recorded tracks from previous albums. Despite the content being a conglomeration of old, new and covers, the band are able to keep an Egyptian overtone for the duration of the album; a dry yet mystically unique sound that is highly reminiscent of Canada's own Aeternam.

The guitar work here is clean and precise, and like the rest of the musical arrangements it's also very minimalistic and simple; albeit, rhythmic and catchy. The guitar is the key to the Egyptian tone that the group portray within Metahom, as many of the leads are played with a twangy annunciation on higher frets and strings. The rhythm guitar can be gritty at times, although it's generally light and melodic in tone while presenting dark, melancholic chords. Simple, repetitive and spacious, the riffs leave ample room for atmosphere, however the band rarely take advantage of the room they've left and in the end leave the album feeling lightweight and thin. The drumming could help remedy the floating lightness of Metahom with some help from the bass drum, but other than the double bass kicks within "The Cardinal Sin" this doesn't happen. The drumming is mediocre at best, and on a casual play through may very well be invisible to the listener as the element is little more than background filler.


Unfortunately, the vocals fail to conjure up any true grit or power; this could be easily blamed on the mixing within the material, as the vocal track is set to the same volume as the rest of the instruments and little to no presence has been added to make them stand out. Even though the growling itself is well done, there is little passion and enthusiasm behind the vocals. Oddly enough, the vocals shine brighter during the cover songs, as opposed to the three new tracks. While the majority of the content focuses on growls, there are glimpses of clean singing sparsely scattered around the tracks, which provide a slight gothic mood to the material.

Metahom is very basic, vanilla melodic metal in the grand scheme. The highlight of the album shines on the Egyptian-worshiping guitar picking, and the rest slips through the cracks. The three new tracks, "Metamorphoses", "Metahom" and "Tartaros" are decent efforts, but they lack substance and passion from the band. The two covers, "Daemonos" and "The Cardinal Sin" are well done and showcase the potential of the group if they step up their gruffness and complexity. "A Voice from the Forgotten Depths" is a nicely done re-recording of an older track, and proves that Atra Hora have more to offer than what little effort is displayed within the first few tracks. For those with a craving for industrial, the band have included a remixed version of "They Go...", which has a great Velvet Acid Christ industrial style to it that's as enjoyable as it is maniacal. If you enjoyed the previous effort of the band, you may not find that Metahom is worth your while, but it's definitely worth checking out if you have half an hour to kill.

Physical Copy Provided by: Darknagar Records