Sunday, September 18, 2011

Review: Winds of Plague - Against the World

After having really high hopes that Winds of Plague would eventually just stick with one style of music, instead of continually creating a mish mash of something that will be referred to as Ghetto Symphonic Deathrapcore, it is a shame to say that Against the World is absolutely no exception to this genre abomination.

Genre: Symphonic Deathcore/Blackened Death Metal
Label: Century Media

Release Date: April 19th, 2011

  1. Raise the Dead
  2. One for the Butcher
  3. Drop the Match
  4. Built for War
  5. Refined in the Fire
  6. The Warrior Code
  7. Against the World
  8. Monsters
  9. Most Hated
  10. Only Song We're Allowed to Play in Church Venues
  11. California
  12. Strength to Dominate

Total Playtime: 36 minutes, 07 seconds

Official Website                 

Rating: 4.0/10





After having really high hopes that Winds of Plague would eventually just stick with one style of music, instead of continually creating a mish mash of something that will be referred to as Ghetto Symphonic Deathrapcore, it is a shame to say that Against the World is absolutely no exception to this genre abomination.

"Raise the Dead" and "One for the Butcher" are the two most enjoyable tracks on this album. The first impression of "Raise the Dead" is that it is reminiscent of The Nightmare Before Christmas. The song "Drop the Match" crushed what little faith was left that Winds of Plague would finally make the jump from ghetto symphonic deathrapcore to real symphonic metal, but we'll get to that later.

The lyrics are still what you would expect from any Winds of Plague album, incredibly lame with only a few noteworthy lines such as "I fear no evil, evil fucking fears me" and... well that's really it. And it's still lame. The vocals are still heavily metalcore influenced with a sprinkle of half-assed mainstream black metal, and there are still the portions of songs where you can't help but be taken aback by the random straight edge ghetto fab rap lines, such as the entire song Drop the Match. If we could, lets take a second to review the most used line of that song: "Burn this mother fucker down!" High quality shit, right?


The synths really have the potential to be good and worthwhile, but most of the time (for the exception of intro/outro tracks) they are just used as filler between stiff, ghetto breakdowns. The only really enjoyable songs on this album are the ones with more synth in them, like "Built for War", the intro synths to that song sounds a lot like something from Batman the movie.



There is just one last individual track that needs a light shone down upon it and that is "California", which is hands down the most ghetto fab track on this entire album. "We're from the west coast, the mother fuckin' best coast" is just one of the introductory lines to this bad boy, along with "Put your hands up and reach for the sky, do what I say or let the bullets fly!"

As far as the other instruments, it's all basically the same as the previous albums. The same breakdowns with a few incorporated pinch harmonics, more hardcore breakdown chants, etc. There is no material on this CD that stands out enough for me to recommend it as a purchase. Not even the album art, which is the same "Great Stone Warrior" from previous album artwork.


Yeah, they have some big name guests on some tracks including WWE's Ultimate Warrior and Jamey Jasta from Hatebreed, but unless they sold this album as a 3 song EP consisting of Raise the Dead, One for the Butcher and Built for War, nothing could improve it without completely dropping the obvious.

With the steady incline of fame metalcore and deathcore are getting, this album will fly off the shelves and most likely be claimed as the best release by Winds of Plague yet. While it is their best release to date, it is still weak and needs major improvement.

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