Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Review: Orange Goblin - A Eulogy For The Damned

The mid 90's era saw a boom of stoner metal, followed by a revival of doom metal with the likes of Electric Wizard, Cathedral and Acid King. Orange Goblin, however, stood out among the cloud of smoke and emerged with a unique sound all their own that alternates between twangy, upbeat southern metal and slower groove songs. After forming in 1995, Orange Goblin released their debut album in 1997. Six albums later and the London band have still proven themselves worthy to bear the title "Grandfathers of Stoner Metal". Does their seventh full length release, A Eulogy for the Damned, hold just as strong?

Genre: Stoner Metal
Release Date: February 13th, 2012

  1. Red Tide Rising
  2. Stand For Something
  3. Acid Trail
  4. The Filthy & The Few
  5. Save Me From Myself
  6. The Fog
  7. Return to Mars
  8. Death of Aquarius
  9. The Bishop's Wolf
  10. 1A Eulogy For The Damned
Total Play Time: 49 minutes, 21 seconds







Rating: 9.5/10






The mid 90's era saw a boom of stoner metal, followed by a revival of doom metal with the likes of Electric Wizard, Cathedral and Acid King. Orange Goblin, however, stood out among the cloud of smoke and emerged with a unique sound all their own that alternates between twangy, upbeat southern metal and slower groove songs. After forming in 1995, Orange Goblin released their debut album in 1997. Six albums later and the London band have still proven themselves worthy to bear the title "Grandfathers of Stoner Metal". Does their seventh full length release, A Eulogy for the Damned, hold just as strong?

What is clearly noticeable from the start of the album, after "Red Tide Rising" rolls in with a soft synthesized wave intro, is the much improved audio quality. In previous releases, the audio is always muffled and there is little to no clarity between each instrument. In saying this there is also concern that the fuzzy distortion signature to the bands style could be lost within the clarity, however this fear is soon abandoned once the song begins with a distorted guitar note being strummed over and over again before the bass and drums come crashing in, delivering an unexpected explosion as a whole new audible world is created. As the vocals come into play, it is also clear to hear that Ben Ward retains his signature style which is just as overwhelming and powerful as always.


Along with the aforementioned opening track "Red Tide Rising", "The Filthy and The Few" is one other track that stands out among the rest, giving off a real western outlaw/biker bad ass vibe which makes a great bridge for the subsequent song "Save Me From Myself" which is much more slow and reflective. The material given on A Eulogy For The Damned offers great diversity which keeps the listeners attention by not staying at the same tempo. Starting off with an upbeat track and switching off the next with a slower, groove song. Some listeners may find tracks such as "Save Me From Myself" and "Death of Aquarius" a bit too slow, but this keeps the album from droning on too long and is a welcome change of pace, reminding us that Orange Goblin have also upheld their ability to create memorable doom songs. The drums have a smooth sound with a hard kick when the bass drum hits, amping up the intensity of the tracks. Martyn Miller shows off beastly, gritty drive with bass lines that tie the fast paced, southern guitars together to the drums eloquently.

When you put everything together, A Eulogy For The Damned is almost an instant stoner metal classic. Orange Goblin are stronger than ever in this release, the explosive drive is almost overwhelming in the crystal clear audio quality and allows an experience like never before due to the poor, muffled sound quality from the past material. Having everything from bad ass, fast paced songs that one could picture listening to in a biker bar to slower doom songs that take you away to the universe, this album is a must hear.

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