Thursday, July 05, 2012

Review: Terrorizer - Hordes of Zombies

Terrorizer are one of those bands that likes to pop up randomly from time to time before retreating into a hibernation state. Originally formed in 1987, Terrorizor released a few demos and then split up before even recording their revolutionary and highly revered debut album, World Downfall. The content was recorded and released after the break up in 1989, and the band had been on hiatus ever since. Out of nowhere they revived themselves in 2005 for the highly anticipated follow up, Darker Days Ahead. The album majorly flopped and was seen largely as a monumental disappointment in metal history, and soon after its release original guitarist Jesse Pintado died from alleged diabetes complications. The band have been in limbo ever since and possess only one founding member who just happens to be drummer Pete "Commando" Sandoval from Morbid Angel. Now, six years after their second full-length effort the band have returned with a third follow up. Given the amount of time between releases, was Hordes of Zombies worth the wait?

Genre: Death Metal/Grindcore
Label: Season of Mist
Release Date: February 24th, 2012
  1. Intro
  2. Hordes of Zombies
  3. Ignorance and Apathy
  4. Subterfuge
  5. Evolving Era
  6. Radiation Syndrome
  7. Flesh to Dust
  8. Generation Chaos
  9. Broken Mirrors
  10. Prospect of Oblivion
  11. Malevolent Ghosts
  12. Forward to Annihilation
  13. State of Mind
  14. A Dying Breed
Total Playtime: 38 minutes, 07 seconds

Official Website               


Rating: 6.0/10






Terrorizer are one of those bands that likes to pop up randomly from time to time before retreating into a hibernation state. Originally formed in 1987, Terrorizor released a few demos and then split up before even recording their revolutionary and highly revered debut album, World Downfall. The content was recorded and released after the break up in 1989, and the band had been on hiatus ever since. Out of nowhere they revived themselves in 2005 for the highly anticipated follow up, Darker Days Ahead. The album majorly flopped and was seen largely as a monumental disappointment in metal history, and soon after its release original guitarist Jesse Pintado died from alleged diabetes complications. The band have been in limbo ever since and possess only one founding member who just happens to be drummer Pete "Commando" Sandoval from Morbid Angel. Now, six years after their second full-length effort the band have returned with a third follow up. Given the amount of time between releases, was Hordes of Zombies worth the wait?

Looking at a lot of the main content in metal as a whole, it's safe to say that anyone who is out of fresh ideas can always fall back on the explosive zombie fad that is sweeping every corner of the mainstream right now. It's also safe to say that it has been done before... again, and again, and again since the dawn of death metal. Yes, the subject is tried and true but an interesting one nonetheless and the album comes with interesting cover art to boot. Unfortunately, what lies beneath is the most stagnant of death metal/grindcore fusions.

Hordes of Zombies starts out with promise, the introductory track sets the content up for a grim b-film atmosphere as tires come screeching to a halt, sirens fill the background and the flicker of fire can be heard. Soon comes the shuffling of feet, obviously meant to be that of zombies due to the inhumane movement heard, and lots of hungry groaning. "Radiation Syndrome" and "Forward to Annihilation" reinforce the ambiance a little, further into the content. The first five tracks hold their own and make use of fast tremolo strummed riffs, generic guitar tricks such as diminished picking for that eerie vibe, and ear catching drum fills that pound away relentlessly. This does start to wear thin come the end of the fifth song, and from this point on the album feeds off itself.


"Hordes of Zombies" and "Evolving Era" are two of the highlights on this material, being that they show the most diversity amongst the fourteen track listing, having powerful double bass drumming sections that partner virtuously with tamer riffs before everything flies into a frenzy again. The rest of the content within is very predictable and filled to the brim with standard riffs and mind numbing repetitiveness. "Radiation Syndrome" and "Forward to Annihilation" are a couple of runner-ups that offer minimal variety that shows in a swampy sea of mediocrity.

The bass track is hidden fairly well and doesn't make any real outstanding contributions throughout the material other than keeping it heavy. There is also the newly enlisted guitar talents of Katrina Culture who demonstrates a fine job in her role, keeping the rhythms both furiously fast and heavy. However, the riffs chosen are well beyond predictable and average and they don't change throughout the content whatsoever. Vocalist Anthony Rezhawk returns on this release, delivering a decent but also unvaried performance of a modernized gruff style.

Terrorizer haven't yet lived up to their original debut album by any means, though Hordes of Zombies is a decent display of the talent possessed by Pete Sandoval... but that can be heard in any Morbid Angel release. What makes his drumming skills stand out more here is the repetition that engulfs everything around him, making the most mundane of drum rolls a welcome change. Though Hordes of Zombies is better than its disappointing predecessor, it lacks anything memorable and will soon fade into the abyss over time.

Reactions:

1 Shouts:

  1. hola,esta placa es excelente,es acaso la primera ? soy de argentina y me costo encontrar información de la banda , aunque el cantante me recuerda a una banda llamada resistance culture tienen algo que ver? bueno la verdad es que hace mucho esperaba algo así , los felicito y gracias por la musica.

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