Saturday, March 16, 2013

Review: Thy Art is Murder - Hate

Australian technical deathcore band Thy Art is Murder achieved renowned success with their debut full-length album, The Adversary (reviewed here), in 2010 after having a troublesome start to their career in 2005. The band did away with their original vocalist who was replaced by Chris McMahon for their debut effort, and this time around guitarist Gary Markowski has found himself terminated from the group. Bassist Mick Low also quit the band in 2010 and upon doing so Sean Delander took over bass duties, to which he passed off his guitarist placement, along with Markowski's open spot, to newcomers Tom Brown and Andy Marsh. With a rearranged line-up that includes two founding members, two new additions and one vocalist who lands in the middle of it all, what is the ultimate outcome of Thy Art is Murder's second full-length, Hate?

Genre: Technical Deathcore
Label: Halfcut Records
Release Date: October 19th, 2012
  1. Reign of Darkness
  2. The Purest Strain of Hate
  3. Vile Creations
  4. Shadow of Eternal Sin
  5. Immolation
  6. Infinite Forms
  7. Dead Sun
  8. Gates of Misery
  9. Defective Breed
  10. Doomed from Birth
Total Playtime: 37 minutes, 11 seconds







Rating: 7.5/10






Australian technical deathcore band Thy Art is Murder achieved renowned success with their debut full-length album, The Adversary (reviewed here), in 2010 after having a troublesome start to their career in 2005. The band did away with their original vocalist who was replaced by Chris McMahon for their debut effort, and this time around guitarist Gary Markowski has found himself terminated from the group. Bassist Mick Low also quit the band in 2010 and upon doing so Sean Delander took over bass duties, to which he passed off his guitarist placement, along with Markowski's open spot, to newcomers Tom Brown and Andy Marsh. With a rearranged line-up that includes two founding members, two new additions and one vocalist who lands in the middle of it all, what is the ultimate outcome of Thy Art is Murder's second full-length, Hate?

To be completely honest, the album artwork is what drew me initially to this release. It is one of the greatest pieces of artwork I've come across on recent releases and being an artist myself, I fully appreciate the amount of detail and atmosphere that is present in it. In this case, the artwork really helps to depict the storytelling in the lyrics presented on Hate, especially in the track "Infinite Forms" which paints the picture of this abominable and ever-changing, growing demon that coats the world in fire, destruction and disease. However, that being said, from start to finish the formula on this material is a direct copy and paste project from The Adversary (reviewed here) with minor changes included.


It can be said that the line-up changes within Thy Art is Murder have had little to no effect in changing up their style. If you've heard The Adversary, then you've heard pretty much everything that Hate encompasses. The guitars stick to polyrhythmic double and triplet palm muted riffs that make use of variously timed rests between strums, along with technical melodic solos that are spaced throughout the content; however, the solos are fewer and further between in comparison to the amount that were present on the band's debut full-length. A new addition to the guitar compositions is the use of foreboding, dissonant picking that lines the background, generally at the beginning, of tracks such as "Reign of Darkness", "Vile Creations", "Shadow of Eternal Sin" and "Infinite Forms". The drums this time around are less effective, the group did away with the inhumanly triggered double bass kicks and this, coupled with the all around slower pace of the guitar tempos, causes the album to come off apathetic and empty at times. There are a plethora of very skilled and fluid drum rolls that make their way into the mix, which switch things up now and then, but not enough to cause a substantial difference. The vocals have a lot of stand alone segments where they're backed by nothing but a drum hit here and there, usually a low cymbal crash, which reinforces the hollowness of the tracks. Vocally there is a regression within the content, instead of a large range of low, near-guttural bellows the listener is now met with standard death metal growls that find themselves occasionally backed by high shrills. "Dead Sun" and "Doomed from Birth" each have a guest vocalist, Nico Webers and Joel Birch respectively, who contributes metalcore styled near-clean screams that don't do any favors for the album. Due to the tamer song structures of Hate, the breakdowns that are presented feel unnecessary and ineffective in the long run where as they were the highlight of the band's debut full-length.

It genuinely feels as though Thy Art is Murder have regressed with Hate. The blueprint for this album is taken directly from The Adversary; even the ending track, "Doomed from Birth", is the most melodic song within the material much the same as "Cowards Throne" was for their previous effort. Not much varies from song to song, and the content begins to become predictable even within the few new elements that are incorporated. However, this isn't to say that Hate is a bad album. It's groovier, slightly less technical and overall more melodic than the band's initial release, but it does come off with a heavily recycled feel to it. Recommended for existing fans of Thy Art is Murder, those that enjoyed The Adversary will enjoy Hate, but most likely not as much due to the lackluster drumming, dip in vocals and reused guitar structures.

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