Saturday, September 28, 2013

Review: Eternal Judgment - Fatal Virus

Assaulting Quebec, Canada since 2008, Eternal Judgment have currently released two sets of material; Time for Vengeance, a demo that came out in 2009 and now the Fatal Virus EP which was released at some point in undefined time during 2012. The five piece troop have toured extensively over the past five years, landing themselves alongside acclaimed bands such as Cryptopsy, Reanimator, Profugus Mortis and more; each gig helping the band amass an army of fans. Audiences have been hungering for something more than a demo and now Eternal Judgment have unleashed Fatal Virus, will it captivate or disintegrate?

Genre: Heavy/Thrash Metal
Label: Self-released/independent
Release Date: 2012
  1. Fatal Virus
  2. PowerDrive
  3. War Planet... Prisoners of Hell
  4. Kill to Survive
  5. By My Own
Total Playtime: 28 minutes, 21 seconds







Rating: 10/10





Assaulting Quebec, Canada since 2008, Eternal Judgment have currently released two sets of material; Time for Vengeance, a demo that came out in 2009 and now the Fatal Virus EP which was released at some point in undefined time during 2012. The five piece troop have toured extensively over the past five years, landing themselves alongside acclaimed bands such as Cryptopsy, Reanimator, Profugus Mortis and more; each gig helping the band amass an army of fans. Audiences have been hungering for something more than a demo and now Eternal Judgment have unleashed Fatal Virus, will it captivate or disintegrate?

First off, holy hell, look at that album art! That is one of the most wicked covers to have ever been produced! Bones sticking out of boiling acid, a creepy as fuck mad doctor, a poofy haired thrasher and a complimentary color scheme... when all are combined together it produces an album cover that positively shrieks "pick me up and examine me!" at anyone who happens to pass a glance in its direction. The only thing that could've potentially made the artwork any better would be to make the band logo and album title stand out a little more with a different color, yellow or perhaps red. Either way, it's still one fucking brutal masterpiece. I'd buy the t-shirt, that's for sure.

Moving on to the audible content, the album in totality is a well structured tour de force that thrives with crunchy riffs and groovy beats. No element here is weaker than another, all factors working together to create one of the most unique experiences in thrash metal to come along in recent years. Unlike most thrash metal, the material isn't overburdened with filler riffs or drum beats, but instead focuses on main verse structures. The compositions found throughout the album lean more towards the heavy metal side of things, in that they aren't paced at breakneck speeds, while the overall tone and riffing styles are what make the tunes truly thrash in sound. While some songs like "Fatal Virus" and "Kill to Survive" are frenzied, the EP also incorporates slower tempo tracks, for instance "War Planet... Prisoners of Hell" and "PowerDrive", proving that thrash doesn't have to be done at breakneck speed to be done right. Oh, and there is also cowbell.


The album has a good mix of short and long songs, each that hold the attention of the listener effortlessly. The bass guitar is incredibly pronounced from the start of the content to the very end, the material even breaking at some points to allow for extended bass solos. The tone of the four string is crispy and unmissable as it pervades the space between the guitars and drums, "Be My Own", "PowerDrive" and "Fatal Virus" flaunting the detail at the listener with skillful ease as the bass lines plug along to the guitar riffs and incorporate some of its own interludes. Unforgettable riff structures are the rhythm guitar's specialty, from lightning fast galloping strums to chugging slow tempo power chords and even dissonant picking. While the rhythm guitar provides a memorable grounding structure for the material, the lead guitar solos are among some of the best heard in modern thrash today. The solos combine a plethora of ear gripping techniques and distortion effects to create unique melodies that keep the audience enthralled. Another element that adds to the heavy metal influence of the tracks are the vocals, which are clean in tone and infuse a good range of octaves throughout the content. There are, of course, also the obligatory thrashy chants scattered few and far between, but what would a thrash album be without them?

In terms of audio quality, the material is fairly clear and well layered. However, the drums tend to fall back into the framework a little too far and find themselves consumed by the bass in most cases. While this isn't necessarily a bad thing, given how wonderful the bass lines are, it draws the listeners attention away from the drums more often than not. The drummer does an adequate job on the skins and utilizes drum rolls, cowbell, very few blast beats, a conglomeration of anomalous patterns, quick wrist and foot work, and a variety of techniques that only a skilled drummer can pull off. Though it does take effort to tune into the drums on a regular basis, and on a casual listen the drum track finds itself slipping from earshot. A minor flaw in an otherwise magnificent album.

Eternal Judgment have added an entirely new branch to the thrash metal tree with Fatal Virus. They incorporate just the right tinge of heavy metal to make the content stand out with a neon aura among the floods of new thrash bands to come in the last few years. The EP has a hidden track that lies roughly six minutes into "By My Own" that proves to be one of the greatest tunes in the content, more than worthy of being shown on the track listing, and it is a great unexpected surprise. Fatal Virus is recommended for every metalhead, and is an absolute must hear, no question about it.

Digital Download Provided by: Vlad Promotion

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