Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Review: Night - Night

Swedish heavy metal rockers Night have been teasing the release of their debut self-titled LP since December 2012 when they released their first 7" single Stand Your Ground. They then followed up in April of 2013 with their second single Gunpowder Treason (reviewed here). Now, the time is finally upon us to hear what magic the Night may hold. Without further delay, let's travel into the night! 

Genre: Heavy Metal
Label: Gaphals
Release Date: November 20th, 2013
  1. Fire and Steel
  2. Gunpowder Treason
  3. Out of the Ashes
  4. Running in the Night
  5. Taking You Down
  6. Hang 'em High
  7. Stand Your Ground
  8. Play It Loud
  9. Into the Night
  10. Keep the Fire Burning
Total Playtime: 43 minutes, 59 seconds

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Rating: 7.0/10







Swedish heavy metal rockers Night have been teasing the release of their debut self-titled LP since December 2012 when they released their first 7" single Stand Your Ground. They then followed up in April of 2013 with their second single Gunpowder Treason (reviewed here). Now, the time is finally upon us to hear what magic the Night may hold. Without further delay, let's travel into the night!

From beginning to end Night is empowered with a very distinct set of vocals that are a hybrid of classic greats such as Rob Halford, Dio and Angus Young. Vocalist Burning Fire burns bright through all ten tracks of material presented here and he never falls short of his mark. Ironically the biggest downfall of this album are actually the vocals. "What? Why!" may be an initial thought when reading the preceding comment, but it's regrettably true as the vocals stick to the same octaves and range in almost a set mid-mid-high/high and held pattern. They can grow tedious to the ears at times and fail to keep the attention of the listener after a while, especially considering the duration of the LP is over forty minutes. What ultimately gave Gunpowder Treason its edge vocally is that the two tracks combined fell just short of ten minutes, the two songs presented on that single were definitely cherry picked from the best tracks available and what is heard beyond those two songs are disappointingly more of the same in terms of vocal capability.


The entire album seems to stay on the same tempo, which is daunting when one takes into consideration how long the content actually is. Without any variance in speed the material can come off twice as long and it feels stuck in a limbo between slow and fast, with the compositions sounding as though they barely alter from one track to the next, or bring back recycled riffs and drum beats. The drums could definitely stand to quicken their pace every now and then and perhaps throw in a few drum rolls or solos to toss up the background mix. Though not all is lost here, the musical composure does have its creative parts such as in "Fire and Steel" which opens up the album promisingly with heavy metal chants and a section that allows both guitars and even the bass to take a turn with a short lick. Both guitars carry the same tones all along the album; a slightly distorted standard tuning with minimal fuzz that is common with most instruments of the genre. They're indefinable from one another in most cases, and the lead guitar only really stands out during solos. The solos are fluid and without error, and they're usually over before they really began which is a shame as once the listener really starts to get into it they're pulled back. The rhythm guitar mostly makes use of power chord riffs while alternating techniques of picking style, palm mutes and ring outs. Some of these riffs are incredibly catchy, such as in "Gunpowder Treason", "Fire and Steel", "Stand Your Ground" and "Into the Night". In fact most songs present are really catchy, in small doses or as stand-alone tracks, as the LP in totality bleeds together.

Night have released a fairly typical debut album when it comes to the genre of heavy metal. They have quite a few tracks that stand out, but the LP as a whole falls short of anything spectacular due to lack of variation from song to song. The incorporation of more tempos, guitar pedals, drum beats, and vocal patterns could really spice things up next time around. "Is it bad?" you may be asking yourself at this point and the answer is no. It's not bad by any means, it's just incredibly redundant but it's good heavy metal to kick back to and it may have a couple of songs to get you headbanging on your couch. Recommended for fans of heavy metal, but don't expect anything that's going to rev you up and get you fist pumping.

Physical Copy Provided by: Gaphals

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