Saturday, May 24, 2014

Review: Thyruz - Svik

Quite possibly one of Norway's many best kept secrets, Thyruz have been releasing blasphemies since 1999. Surprisingly, given their long history, the band haven't seen many line-up changes throughout the years but they have released five demos and two full-lengths prior to their third installment, Svik. These guys have toured all over Europe and shared the stage with some well recognized (and controversial) names in black metal, with Mayhem, 1349 and Aeternus leading the forefront. So what exactly do Thyruz sound like, why haven't you heard of them yet, and is it any good? 

Genre: Black Metal
Label: Self-released/independent
Release Date: April 1st, 2014
  1. Prodita
  2. Dødsriket
  3. The Final Holocaust
  4. All Flesh
  5. Svik
  6. Darkness Illuminates All
Total Playtime: 28 minutes, 15 seconds




Rating: 9.0/10




Quite possibly one of Norway's many best kept secrets, Thyruz have been releasing blasphemies since 1999. Surprisingly, given their long history, the band haven't seen many line-up changes throughout the years but they have released five demos and two full-lengths prior to their third installment, Svik. These guys have toured all over Europe and shared the stage with some well recognized (and controversial) names in black metal, with Mayhem, 1349 and Aeternus leading the forefront. So what exactly do Thyruz sound like, why haven't you heard of them yet, and is it any good?

Thyruz have created profoundly dark material that sets a dramatic mood, while utilizing all available elements. The content on Svik is similar to that of Carach Angren, but without the inclusion of symphonic elements; which makes the highly malevolent aria that exists all the more astounding, "Darkness Illuminates All" being the track that sovereignly promotes this atmosphere. Although this short record relies on the plentiful use of tremolos across every track present, with the exception of the instrumental intro, these creative quick picked riffs are infused with refreshing onsets of power chord bridges between structure changes; the most memorable and impacting being the title track, "Svik". Tie in the fact that the guitar has an aggressive, gritty, mechanical distortion and these features make the instrument excel to nearly unparalleled proportions in any recent black metal endeavor.


The vocals are made up of raspy growls that convey dark energy across their evil lyrics; such as in "The Final Holocaust" where the vocalist bellows 'Bring me blood. Bring me death!'. While there are not a wide variety of octaves presented during the material, the vocalist does keep his passion and vibrant ferocity alive for the continuance and in doing such easily keeps the interest of the listener. The drums find themselves on nearly every beat, pattern and technique available for the disposal at some point; be it drum rolls, accelerated double bass kicks, hi-hat smashes, tribal styles and much more. The patterns here change roughly about every thirty seconds or so, and always compliment the riff changes of the guitar.

The only true complaint about Svik is that it's unexpectedly short, in fact it's the shortest full-length from Thyruz and it's half the length of their previous effort, although given the repetitive nature of the tremolo picking if the material ventured any further it may become overly redundant and appeal less; so the band at least know when enough is enough. The album is perfect the way it is, and is incredibly dark without even really trying to be at all; it just so happens that the riff progressions and chords chosen create this type of atmosphere. If you're able to, definitely give this album a listen and be sure to support the artist if you like what you hear... you won't regret it.

Digital Download Provided by: Thyruz

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