Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Review: Hybreed Chaos - Dying Dogma

Any regular readers of Volumes of Sin will know how much of a sucker I am for the Montreal metal scene. I've always said that if I could say more than "mon chien est fou" in French, I'd move there in the blink of an eye; that roughly translates to "my dog is crazy" by the way, which he is. Anyway, Hybreed Chaos are a rather newly inducted four piece into the Montreal underground, they've recently formed in 2012 and have issued their debut EP, Dying Dogma, through PRC Music. It has taken me what feels like an eternity to finally get this review on the table, so without further delay...

Genre: Brutal Death Metal
Label: PRC Music
Release Date: October 29th, 2013
  1. Birth of Chaos
  2. A Machine for Pigs
  3. Dismembered Purity
  4. Emperor
  5. Defiled Servitude
  6. Charogne
  7. Silent Agony
Total Playtime: 29 minutes, 13 seconds




Rating: 7.5/10





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Any regular readers of Volumes of Sin will know how much of a sucker I am for the Montreal metal scene. I've always said that if I could say more than "mon chien est fou" in French, I'd move there in the blink of an eye; that roughly translates to "my dog is crazy" by the way, which he is. Anyway, Hybreed Chaos are a rather newly inducted four piece into the Montreal underground, they've recently formed in 2012 and have issued their debut EP, Dying Dogma, through PRC Music. It has taken me what feels like an eternity to finally get this review on the table, so without further delay...

The content within Dying Dogma has an underlying old school influence, though it's not as overwhelming, or dare say boring, as the recent tidal waves of new OSDM. The material is distinctively reminiscent of early Morbid Angel work, which is further defined during "Defiled Servitude" and "Silent Agony"; both of which have very Domination type grooves. Hybreed Chaos' vocalist François Toutée is nearly spot on at times with David Vincent from Morbid Angel, although with an inclusion of higher growls laced through the content.

Despite having a slight technical edge to the material, the album overall feels decidedly empty. This isn't a bad thing, too often do bands attempt to fill every void of their material; here, the emptiness leaves room for a blood red, barren wasteland of decimated humanity to be painted by the mind, especially within "Dismember Purity" and "Silent Agony". The guitar is bulky in tone, though it's able to make agile use of lead notes and attention grabbing techniques, such as the pinch harmonics, bends and chaotic mini-solos heard within "Dismember Purity" and "Charogne".


The album as a whole has a passive-aggressiveness to it, in that the instruments and vocals hold themselves back until a sudden breaking point that allows a surge of violence to come gushing through. Many of the compositions are slow grooves, such as "Defiled Servitude", which only heat up for brief moments before returning to their doomish pace. The bass does help contribute to the gloom, and it stands out prominently in many of the songs; the most momentous appearance being the small solo it gets during "Charogne", though its technicality far exceeds what is displayed in that small snippet.

Dying Dogma may not blow audiences away on the first play through, but each subsequent listen reveals more that may not have been heard the first time around. Hybreed Chaos have taken a large, noticeable influence from Morbid Angel and have incorporated it into each track on the album, which isn't necessarily a bad thing but it negates the ability to call their work completely unique. Furthermore, "Charogne" has a mountain of riffs that are taken directly from "Evisceration Plague" by Cannibal Corpse, just with a few notes left out here and there. Highly worth a listen, though don't go in expecting any fully original structures; just original accents and additives.

Physical Copy Provided by: Hybreed Chaos

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