Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Review: Omnihility - Deathscapes of the Subconscious

From Oregon hail the four entities who amass to create the band known as Omnihility. Formed in 2009, the band have previously issued forth a self-titled demo and subsequently self-titled EP in 2010. It's rumored that there was also a full-length to be released at this time, but the material was withheld due to a line-up change within the band. The underground was finally greeted with the band's debut LP in 2012, Biogenesis. It received a mix of praise and rejection among crowds and critics, though Omnihility ultimately found a solid fan base within it all. With nothing to tide them over in between, fans have been rabidly craving new material from the group, and it has come in the form of Deathscapes of the Subconscious

Genre: Technical Death Metal, Brutal Death Metal
Release Date: July 22nd, 2014
  1. Molecular Resurrection
  2. Contemplating the Ineffable
  3. Lost Sands of Antiquity
  4. Ancient Ruins Forlorn I
  5. Deathscapes of the Subconscious
  6. Disseminate
  7. The Unnameable
  8. Divine Evisceration
  9. Ancient Ruins Forlorn II
Total Playtime: 43 minutes, 04 seconds




Rating: 4.5/10





From Oregon hail the four entities who amass to create the band known as Omnihility. Formed in 2009, the band have previously issued forth a self-titled demo and subsequently self-titled EP in 2010. It's rumored that there was also a full-length to be released at this time, but the material was withheld due to a line-up change within the band. The underground was finally greeted with the band's debut LP in 2012, Biogenesis. It received a mix of praise and rejection among crowds and critics, though Omnihility ultimately found a solid fan base within it all. With nothing to tide them over in between, fans have been rabidly craving new material from the group, and it has come in the form of Deathscapes of the Subconscious.

Welcome to triggered bass drums, the album. If you're not okay with that, then you may want to turn around now and never look back. If you are okay with that, you may still want to turn around now and never look back. Right from the start the material is grainy and distorted to the point that it sounds like a speaker blew out during the recording session, despite the overall high production quality. It isn't intentional, as is the case with many low grade titles, but rather the product of shoddy recording and mixing. To further add kindling to the pyre, the drums are brought up way too far into the front of the album, and it causes the listener to focus on them for the majority of the content.

If one can get past the abhorrent quality, Deathscapes of the Subconscious is filled with triggered double bass kicks; the most offending found within "Contemplating the Ineffable". It's hard to look beyond this element since the drums sit so high on the mix, the bass drum triggers actually takes away from anything else that the newcomer Steve Crum attempts to accomplish behind the kit; the drums also take away from the surrounding guitars and bass. Coupled with the piss poor production, the drumming is as awful as the programming from any given Chainsaw Dissection album.


Aside from the completely shameful drumming, the rest of the material is what can be referred to as amateur-advanced; in that the techniques that are used are advanced, but not yet mastered or refined. The title track is really the only song worth while, and it has an alright sweeping solo; even though it's simply the same notes over and over backed by, you guessed it, triggered double bass drums. There are a lot of little pieces of technicality scattered throughout the album, but nothing overly satisfying; in fact, there's not even enough complexity to truly call this release a technical death metal effort. When it comes to the rhythm guitar, there isn't a single clean chord played, everything is palm muted to some degree. The structures are decent enough, and enjoyable here and there, but whatever long lasting entertainment that they may offer is covered up by the god damn drumming.

The mentality that Ohmnility have put forth with Deathscapes of the Subconscious is that of "how do we make it as brutal and fast as possible?" Well, the band have made a deathly aggressive record, but unfortunately they've gone about it in an unappealing manner. It's really a waste, the album comes with a high potential and it has a dry, blistering infernal atmosphere that makes one really want to enjoy the material. Ultimately, though the cover art and title are appealing, this album is a hesitant pass. The only thing salvageable here are the from-the-balls vocals from hell. Maybe in the future Ohmnility will be able to harness their ability and work together to create a fluid album, without the horrid quality and mechanical, overpowering drum 'enhancements'.

Digital Download Provided by: Earsplit PR

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