Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Review: All I Could Bleed - Burying the Past

With a name like All I Could Bleed, one would be expecting metal of the -core variety; if going by traditional standards. Surprisingly enough, this Russian quintet are an experimental/melodic death metal ensemble. Born in 2004 under an unknown name, the group changed their name to Sacrifice in 2007 and then again to All I Could Bleed in 2009. They've had their fair share of bassists, drummers and keyboardists through the years, though they eventually settled down into their current line-up. The band have shared the stage with some of the bigger names in metal, most prominently Children of Bodom and Arch Enemy. With a new album being teased around the corner, let's delve into their debut full-length, Burying the Past.

Genre: Melodic Death Metal
Release Date: June 20th, 2011
  1. Eclipse
  2. Private Hell
  3. Burying the Past
  4. Plague
  5. Under the Moon
  6. Into the Black Clouds
  7. Follow Me
  8. Valhalla
  9. Farewell
Total Playtime: 37 minutes, 21 seconds




Rating: 7.5/10





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With a name like All I Could Bleed, one would be expecting metal of the -core variety; if going by traditional standards. Surprisingly enough, this Russian quintet are an experimental/melodic death metal ensemble. Born in 2004 under an unknown name, the group changed their name to Sacrifice in 2007 and then again to All I Could Bleed in 2009. They've had their fair share of bassists, drummers and keyboardists through the years, though they eventually settled down into their current line-up. The band have shared the stage with some of the bigger names in metal, most prominently Children of Bodom and Arch Enemy. With a new album being teased around the corner, let's delve into their debut full-length, Burying the Past.

From the beginning, there are undeniable Cradle of Filth, Children of Bodom and Arch Enemy influences present as All I Could Bleed fuse sophisticated electronic embellishments with gloomy gothic lyric matter and a rocking backdrop that sports dominate female growls. While the group as a whole are able to bring their musical structures together, the core of the material is a rather generic slab of melodic death metal. From the unremarkable tone of the guitar and the riffs that ensue to the lackluster drum patterns, the largest portion of Burying the Past relies on tried and true rhythms to carry it from start to finish.

Some tracks have more to offer than others, for instance "Under the Moon"; if you're planning on giving this band a shot, this is hands down the song that should be your introduction to them. It offers up some of the more unique compositions throughout the album, and has a tantalizing intro that harmonizes clean guitar picking with folk themed synthetic elements. It's also one of the few tracks that feature clean, power male vocals where as the remainder of the material features impressive female growls. Psycheya's vocals are harnessed and executed in a superb manner that rivals that of Angela Gossow, and in being such high quality her vocals actually take away from the clean male vocals; needless to say, the male vocals don't exactly fit in some areas where they are placed, and it may prove more beneficial if they are left out in the future.


While the rhythm guitar and drumming segments are okay at best, the bass guitar and keyboards are the elements that truly shine within the material. The synths both pierce the background and blaze through the foreground, in rampant excursions of chaotic piano trills or Castlevania-esque organs. Using a Victorian era composure style, the synthesizer provokes the idea of London during the 1800's while imbuing the ideal with a sharp, elegant edge. There's even a mild Powerglove style heard within some tracks, which come across with more of a video game based atmosphere than what one would believe to be intended; this is helped along by the harmonized lead guitar and synthesizer leads.

Even though All I Could Bleed haven't completely carved out a unique sound for themselves, they are on the right path to doing so with Burying the Past. The group have the vocals, keyboards and lead guitar to pull their sound together, but their rhythm guitar and drum work needs a serious injection of creativity. The content flounders between styles throughout the album, which keeps the band from settling on one style from too long. Even though it rarely gets the spotlight it deserves, the bass guitar displays a few jazzy solos during the material; future releases would benefit from using this element to its full potential. The clean male vocals are of the take it or leave it variety, although they do contribute slightly to the gothic approach of the band. Even with its share of faults, Burying the Past is worth a few listens; especially if you have love for Archy Enemy and Children of Bodom.

Physical Copy Provided by: Darknagar Records

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